Stress and Eating

Shared from Psychology Today Stress and Eating You crave rich foods when stress is unrelenting. And a very special and well-meaning collaboration between your brain and your body makes you do it. Remember that deep dive into the peanut butter in the months after 9/11? How about the incredible allure of chocolate when the seemingly last possibility for anything wonderful has just fizzled in your face? No, it's not your imagination. You really do crave rich foods when stress is unrelenting. And a very special and well-meaning collaboration between your brain and your body makes you do it. The newly discovered body-brain partnership may shed new light on so-called atypical depression, the commo

Five Reasons Why We Overeat In Winter

Shared from Forbes It’s winter again, and I know my body doesn’t really need an extra thousand calories a day. Yet, hunger strikes anyways as I find myself constantly eating too much and working out less—if that’s even possible. As it turns out, according to a recent study by University of Exeter in the U.K., “People have evolved to have subconscious urges to over-eat, and limited ability to avoid becoming obese, especially in winter.” While we may be genetically disposed to overeat and store more fat during the winter months, there are other causes for overeating that we could actually do something about them. So I reached out to two health experts and found some of those main culprits (plu

Why Comfort Food Comforts

Why Comfort Food Comforts A new study looks at the intersection of taste, nostalgia, and loneliness Shared from The Atlantic When the Oxford English Dictionary added a definition for “comfort food” in 1997, it traced the term’s etymology back to a 1977 Washington Post magazine article about Southern cooking: “Along with grits, one of the comfort foods of the South is black-eyed peas." The Oxford English Dictionary, though, was wrong. (“I don’t really believe I created the term,” the author of the Post article wrote in 2013, but “since [1977]—if not before then—it has been one of my favorite food descriptors.”) The phrase “comfort food” has been around at least as early as 1966, when the Palm

The Power of I

The Power of I We were videotaping a segment of the online version of Beneath the Weight – here’s what happened. “My customary eating style is Late Night Snacker. You know how at night while you’re watching TV and . . .“ “Cut. That was good but use the word “I” instead of “you.” “Okay.“ said Alex. “My customary eating style is Late Night Snacker. I like to watch TV at night and you like something salty like potatoes chips. Next thing you know . . .” “Cut. Good, but you said ‘you’ again. I need you to say “I”. “Crap! I did it again? Wow! I can’t believe I did that? “It’s okay. It’s common. If you’re like all the other people we videotaped, it will happen many more times.” “Okay. My custo

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